Tag Archives: Reasons to Homeschool

Please Fix Your Kids

“My son’s impulse control was a disaster,” my friend told me. “He couldn’t not push a button, run the water, poke the red ant.” I was sympathetic. “My son was incapable of sitting still while someone talked to him.” We were chatting about the days when our children were young—back when we both realized that […]

5 Tips and Flips

Over the thirteen years that I’ve been homeschooling, I’ve learned something about good advice: every helpful tip has a balancing flip. Here are a few examples. Good Tip! Know what your goals are. Does your fourth-grader need more work memorizing his multiplication tables? Does your seventh-grader have to learn how to compose paragraphs? You might […]

Tailor-Made Education

Homeschooling is great because you can tailor your child’s education to his/her interests and needs! But what does that even mean? I might give the impression that Darren and I craft every single lesson to each of our children’s interests and needs: “I noticed Sparkler’s attention wandering during math last week, so I’m writing out […]

Cyber Socialization

“What about socialization?” Homeschoolers have been fielding this question for two generations now. The responses range from positive reassurance (“Our kids are involved in church/sports/clubs/volunteer work”) to defensive (“Mainstream ‘socialization’ has a lot of negatives that we want to avoid”). The good news for today’s homeschooling parents is that the answer is a lot easier […]

Discovering Our Styles

One of the great things about homeschooling is that we can conform teaching methods to fit the individual student. I’ve always recognized that my children are unique from one another, but recently I’ve been noticing afresh how their personalities affect their styles of learning, as well as how mine affects my teaching. My oldest, “Daisy,” […]

I’m Game!

Kids learn best when they don’t know they’re learning. Over the years, we’ve invited our children to play games as a kind of “stealth education.” Here are a few of our favorites: Mad Libs. (Age range: kindergarten through high school.) This fill-in-the-blank game is the world’s best for learning parts of speech. Nothing motivates kids […]