It’s Financial Literacy Month! | Enter HSLDA’s GIVEAWAY

It’s Financial Literacy Month! Enter HSLDA’s Giveaway | HSLDA Blog

BLG SZ - hslda_Dave Ramsey giveaway_HSLDA Blog_hi res 2

Did you know that April is National Financial Literacy Month? Together with our new PerX partner Foundations in Personal Finance, we’re celebrating with a giveaway!

Dave Ramsey’s Foundations in Personal Finance is the industry leading personal finance curriculum, with editions specifically geared for middle and high schoolers. This week, we’ve partnered with the Foundations in Personal Finance team to offer you a chance to win a copy of Dave’s homeschool curriculum. We’ll be giving away two copies of each curriculum pack listed below. Be sure to enter today—the giveaway closes at 11:59 p.m. ET on April 17.* (But even if you don’t win, as an HSLDA member, you’ll qualify for a special discount of 10% off of all Foundations homeschool products all year round!)

It’s Financial Literacy Month! Enter HSLDA’s Giveaway | HSLDA BlogFoundations in Personal Finance: Middle School Edition for Homeschool Teacher/Student Pack (two winners)

This teacher/student pack includes everything you’ll need to teach personal finance to middle schoolers, including a student text, teacher resources, age-specific activities, and more!

It’s Financial Literacy Month! Enter HSLDA’s Giveaway | HSLDA BlogFoundations in Personal Finance: High School Edition for Homeschool Teacher/Student Pack (two winners)

This complete curriculum includes lesson plans, video lessons by Dave Ramsey and his team of experts, 35-plus activities, and more—all designed for high school teens!

To enter the giveaway, simply leave a comment below (or email blog@hslda.org) with the ways you’re currently teaching your kids about real life finances. Once you’ve commented below, you can choose from other optional steps to gain more entries by clicking on the ENTER GIVEAWAY HERE button.

After you enter our giveaway, hop on over to Dave’s guest blog post, 5 Things Your Teenager Needs to Know Before College.

And, if you haven’t seen it, Dave Ramsey’s $55,000 Financial Literacy Challenge for high school students is going on this month too! Now through April 25, your students can take the Challenge for a chance to win some great prizes, including a $40,000 college scholarship for a high school senior! Underclassmen can also enter to win one of three Chromebook 2 laptops. We encourage your students to enter today at daveramsey.com/challenge!

It’s Financial Literacy Month! Enter HSLDA’s Giveaway | HSLDA Blog

* The HSLDA Financial Literacy Month Curriculum Giveaway closes at 11:59pm EST, Sunday, April 17, 2016. HSLDA employees and their immediate family members are not eligible to participate in the giveaway. A random drawing will be conducted on April 19, 2016, and the winners will be contacted by email. If a winner does not respond to HSLDA’s prize notification within 24 hours, that entry will be discarded and a new winner will be drawn, with the same response rules applying. Prizes courtesy of Ramsey Solutions. Entrants will receive information about homeschooling news and resources from HSLDA. We value your privacy and will never sell or share your information. You may unsubscribe at any time.

268 thoughts on “It’s Financial Literacy Month! | Enter HSLDA’s GIVEAWAY

  1. We are missionaries in Africa…This gives our 6 and 12 year old multiple opportunities to give, go without, plan wisely, make mistakes, save, receive blessings, and see biblical principles work. We are still working on more concrete ways to train them financially and are still learning much ourselves.

    Like

  2. My husband and I discuss finances with our children when we consider large purchases and vacations for our family. They tithe and save from money they earn. And, I am planning to go through Dave Ramsey’s Foundations in Personal Finance as an elective in our schooling next year–winning a copy would be wonderful!

    Like

  3. My husband and I talk with our children about what products and services cost, as well as what their time is worth based on their knowledge, skills and experience. We include them in discussions and decisions about family purchases. They receive a small allowance and have part-time jobs; part of all their income is tithed and part is saved, in addition to some being set aside for spending (some specifically for clothing, some just for them to choose how to spend). Next year we are planning to go through Dave Ramsey’s Foundations in Personal Finance; I’d love to win this giveaway to use in our homeschool this coming year.

    Like

  4. I have tried to post a comment here twice already. This is the third time; I don’t know why it isn’t working. My husband and I talk with our children about finances, and include them in family financial discussions and decisions, when appropriate. They receive a small allowance and have part-time jobs; part of all the money they receive is tithed, part is saved, and part is set aside for spending (with a portion of their spending money specifically designated for clothing). We encourage entrepreneurial efforts, and are planning to go through Dave Ramsey’s Foundations in Personal Finance as an elective in our homeschooling this coming school year. I’d love to win this to use in the fall!

    Like

  5. My children see us budget on a daily basis, especially our food allowance. They see me meal plan and coupon and see how that really saves us money in the grocery store.

    Like

  6. We have teenage sons who have jobs so we are trying to help them use their money wisely. In the process we are hopeful that the younger kids are watching and learning from their mistakes and success. We have tried to implement many of the principles we have learned from Dave Ramsey and pass those on to the children as well. One last thing is that we are using Math-U-See Stewardship for the older boys also.

    Like

  7. We give him opportunities to earn money and then teach him to tithe and save what he has for important purchases. He also shops with me and has learned the value of making comparisons and smart choices. Would like to further equip him for leaving the nest!!

    Like

  8. Our kids earn a salary for the work that they do. 50% they get to spend. 25% they save for large purchases and 25% is for regular giving. If they don’t do a chore on their salary list on time, their pay is deducted and they have to do the chore anyway. If they want to give above their normal they give from their spending envelope… I will not give to the Lord that which costs me nothing.

    Like

  9. Oh boy, do we need this! Our homeschool would have a marvelous addition by adding this financial course to our materials. Our ladies need to learn how money works, how God views money, and the impact these have on their whole life. We would love to incorporate these life lessons in our school day!

    Like

  10. We are playing store and restaurant in school. Our children are learning about the tithe and are giving cheerfully to the Lord. They recently earned some money by doing a job well done at a relative’s house. Our 5 year old said, “Mommy, I am going to save my money to buy a house.” Would love to have a cirriculum to help our children learn more about finances!

    Like

  11. We have been going through financial peace university with our oldest children (ages 12-16) We have also had them read “life of Fred’s” financial choices book. This year we also gave them the opportunity to invest some of our money into stocks of their choice, and then they will keep half of the profits from the investments.

    Like

  12. Our children go with us as we shop. We often use yard sales and thrift stores to get deals. When we shop retail, we discuss unit cost, store brands, and sales. We also have shared our goals to be debt-free and pay cash for all possible items. They see our budgeting and saving practices.

    Like

  13. We are encouraging financial responsibility by using a give, save, spend savings bank to our children. We talk to them aboutthe importance of it and why we implement a budget. We also don’t keep our budget a ‘secret’ from them and encourage them to listen in while my husband and I discuss the budget, how we’re using it and why its important.

    Like

  14. I have always included my children in financial issues in our home, it has never been secret. We make a practice of praying over financial decisions. I have taught them about tithing. My children are now in the process of learning to track their earning and spending. Any help in this area is always useful as I have two high school children and one in middle school.

    Like

  15. We are constantly talking about debt with our son. How to avoid it and how dangerous it is to be in debt. We model a debt free lifestyle, saving right now to pay for a home without the mortgage!

    Like

  16. We already use some of Dave Ramsey’s materials, and we are very excited about this new curriculum!.. My kids love the Dollar Bill books.. 🙂

    Like

  17. We have 3 children we primarily are teaching them by example. We follow a budget, and we plan our purchases. They also have to manage their own money in a similar fashion. We used Dave’s junior series as our model.

    Like

  18. One way we have taught our kids about managing their finances is to pay them for doing jobs around the house like mowing the lawn, so that when they “want” something they can save up for it or use that money to purchase it. We are trying to promote the “No buying on credit and less dependency on parents as they get older” philosophy. They tend to ask less for things, are more carefull with their money, learn the value of work, become more responsible, and search out jobs at home and with others when they have a want.

    Like

  19. My husband and I include our children in discussions about finances and debt, when appropriate. We compare prices, and discuss with them what their time is worth to an employer, based on their knowledge, skills, expertise and experience. They receive a small allowance and have part-time jobs; part of all money they receive is set aside for tithe, part for savings and part for spending. We are planning to go through Dave Ramsey’s Foundations in Personal Finance as part of their homeschooling next year; it would be wonderful to win this!

    Like

  20. we are believers in the “financial freedom” life style. We share this with everyone we know and encourage our children to embrace this lifestyle.

    Like

  21. we are teaching financial life lessons to our younger two children through our college age child who has been making some very wise choices financially.

    Like

  22. Our teens have hands on experience with finances because they take part in our family finance summits and help with input into the budget and paying bills, etc. They all have jobs now and have learned from very young that they give, save and spend and plan where every dollar goes.

    Like

  23. I have taught a Finance class at a local co-op, but am always looking for more resources to help these teens launch into the community!

    Thanks

    Like

  24. Family discussions when financial decisions come up–so children can see the thought-process and decision-making process. Sometimes have children sit with us while doing bills. Children each had “My Giving Bank”–although we weren’t very faithful in teaching them to use them. Have them earn & save money for summer camp themselves.

    Like

  25. My husband and I were not very good with our money for many years so we have been teaching by example. “This is what we did, and you should never do that.” But I would love to teach them more than that.

    Like

  26. I’m trying to teach my high schooler how to budget her money. She has two bills she pays and then her things that she pays. My other two children I’m trying to teach how to manage their money. I even try to make them save there receipts, keep up with a notebook to write things down on how much you have spent. They just don’t understand how you need to save and not touch the savings. lol 😔

    Like

  27. As parents of 5 kiddos, our oldest is 13. We compensate them on a point system and they have envelopes in which they put percentages for spending, giving and spending. The oldest also saves for his own clothing and gifts. Would really love to have this for our oldest.

    Like

  28. We matched funds that our son was saving to pay cash for his first car. He has always had to work to earn money for extras and he did that in various small businesses he started himself with our help. He now is working as a coach of Parkour, which is his passion, and he’s only 15. We have taught him the joy of giving and he tithes on his earnings with a cheerful heart. There is much more to teach him, but we think he is on the right track!

    Like

  29. Just one of many ways we are teaching our children about finances is through 4H livestock show animals. Our goal is to teach them that purchasing a high dollar show animal will not make them any money. We purchased our show goats at market price and are expecting to sell at a profit or right at break even. With their premium sale money they will pay for the feed and any other supplies needed for the project. Sometimes there is an unforeseen loss – due to sickness or death – but that is part of the learning process and part of raising livestock. This will be our kids’ third year to buy goats from the profit of last years goat project. First and foremost is tithing. Part of their winnings goes toward college, next years 4H projects, savings, and spending. There is some planning involved and the kids are learning that they have to wait to purchase things until they have enough money.

    Like

  30. We’ve had conversations about how to save, how to avoid getting into debt, how to tithe, etc., but not in an organized fashion. I think this curriculum looks great and would love to use it with our high schooler!

    Like

  31. Starting with learning work and service. Often others pay my kids for the work they have done. After putting part away for giving they can buy at the store. Learning that cash only goes so far, there’s tax involved, and the enjoyment of purchasing with earned money. Some times they choose to save: a piggybank and seed packets are current goals.

    Like

  32. Love Dave Ramsey’s concepts and curriculum. My husband and I teach FPU, so our oldest son sat through several classes. He is now financially independent, with a full time job, attending college full time, at 19 years of age. Looking forward to teaching the Foundations curriculum to our other two sons over the next few years!

    Like

  33. Thankfully my parents and older brother taught me well about finances and when my husband and I started dating, they solidified his thought about being financially wise as well. One of my favorite tips my brother had was to deduct credit card purchases from your check register as if it was a check paid out, but instead of a check number have a code like MC1 (meaning master card January), then when the bill comes at the end of the month you KNOW you have enough to pay it off and you don’t deduct the check amount (just put the amount in parentheses after the transaction description). I run a business (cash based) and they see our finances and budget as we work through those. They grocery shop with me and tithe when they make money. Right now we’re going through Math-U-See’s Stewardship curriculum (sort of a pre- Personal Finance) and it’s fun to chat with them about all sorts of things. We also listen to Dave Ramsey’s show often as well. We would LOVE to have a chance to use this with our two HS’ers!!!

    Like

  34. Our kids have loved Dave Ramsey since we started listening to him. Our oldest daughter went through Financial Peace University CD’s with us and took her own notes. It was a great day when she counted out the hundred dollar bills to pay for her first car. Thank you, Dave!

    Like

  35. Our 8th grade daughter is taking the high school version of Dave Ramsey’s Foundations in Personal Finance curriculum at our homeschool co-op. She loves it!! Ever since our kids have been receiving money, we’ve been teaching them about budgeting–through our own budget as well as establishing one of their own. They’re always glad to see that they have money of their own to spend on vacations, on gifts at Christmas and on birthdays.

    Like

What are your thoughts?

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s