It’s Financial Literacy Month! | Enter HSLDA’s GIVEAWAY

It’s Financial Literacy Month! Enter HSLDA’s Giveaway | HSLDA Blog

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Did you know that April is National Financial Literacy Month? Together with our new PerX partner Foundations in Personal Finance, we’re celebrating with a giveaway!

Dave Ramsey’s Foundations in Personal Finance is the industry leading personal finance curriculum, with editions specifically geared for middle and high schoolers. This week, we’ve partnered with the Foundations in Personal Finance team to offer you a chance to win a copy of Dave’s homeschool curriculum. We’ll be giving away two copies of each curriculum pack listed below. Be sure to enter today—the giveaway closes at 11:59 p.m. ET on April 17.* (But even if you don’t win, as an HSLDA member, you’ll qualify for a special discount of 10% off of all Foundations homeschool products all year round!)

It’s Financial Literacy Month! Enter HSLDA’s Giveaway | HSLDA BlogFoundations in Personal Finance: Middle School Edition for Homeschool Teacher/Student Pack (two winners)

This teacher/student pack includes everything you’ll need to teach personal finance to middle schoolers, including a student text, teacher resources, age-specific activities, and more!

It’s Financial Literacy Month! Enter HSLDA’s Giveaway | HSLDA BlogFoundations in Personal Finance: High School Edition for Homeschool Teacher/Student Pack (two winners)

This complete curriculum includes lesson plans, video lessons by Dave Ramsey and his team of experts, 35-plus activities, and more—all designed for high school teens!

To enter the giveaway, simply leave a comment below (or email blog@hslda.org) with the ways you’re currently teaching your kids about real life finances. Once you’ve commented below, you can choose from other optional steps to gain more entries by clicking on the ENTER GIVEAWAY HERE button.

After you enter our giveaway, hop on over to Dave’s guest blog post, 5 Things Your Teenager Needs to Know Before College.

And, if you haven’t seen it, Dave Ramsey’s $55,000 Financial Literacy Challenge for high school students is going on this month too! Now through April 25, your students can take the Challenge for a chance to win some great prizes, including a $40,000 college scholarship for a high school senior! Underclassmen can also enter to win one of three Chromebook 2 laptops. We encourage your students to enter today at daveramsey.com/challenge!

It’s Financial Literacy Month! Enter HSLDA’s Giveaway | HSLDA Blog

* The HSLDA Financial Literacy Month Curriculum Giveaway closes at 11:59pm EST, Sunday, April 17, 2016. HSLDA employees and their immediate family members are not eligible to participate in the giveaway. A random drawing will be conducted on April 19, 2016, and the winners will be contacted by email. If a winner does not respond to HSLDA’s prize notification within 24 hours, that entry will be discarded and a new winner will be drawn, with the same response rules applying. Prizes courtesy of Ramsey Solutions. Entrants will receive information about homeschooling news and resources from HSLDA. We value your privacy and will never sell or share your information. You may unsubscribe at any time.

268 thoughts on “It’s Financial Literacy Month! | Enter HSLDA’s GIVEAWAY

  1. A great tool to teach financial literacy. Currently, with my own children, they are learning about the power that a dollar can bring in purchasing something. I am a Couponer where as I am learning how to use coupons to get more for my money. I take my children with me sometimes and explain to them what I am doing so that they can understand how to buy things with less money – or get more for the money you spend.

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  2. We’re training our children for adulthood by encouraging and supporting them in starting their own businesses (that spin off from our home-based businesses), tracking income and expenses, encouraging investments in various hobbies and projects and going through Financial Peace University when they are young adults. Winning one of the curriculum prizes would be wonderful!

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  3. I am currently teaching my children great ways NOT to handle their finances. 😦 We are in need of Dave Ramsey’s assistance!! I am certain the information in the Foundations program will apply to our entire family. Thank you for the opportunity to win.

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  4. Having homeschooled for 21 years in several states, we have used many methods to teach our children wise stewardship of resources and abilities. Our children have had opportunities to perform yard work and house work for neighbors, sold baked goods to buy textbooks, bartered and sold used items, and taught music lessons. They have learned to shop frugally by knowing when and how and where to shop. Through all of this, they have budgeted their money and kept a money log. We would love to take a more formal approach to our financial education by using this Dave Ramsey course. Thank you for entering our name in the drawing.

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  5. We have our family budget posted where all eyes can see. We regularly discuss our budget as a family and work together to make better choices. When the kids ask for items or opportunities, we consult the budget together to see if it is a possibility. For example, my son asked today if we could meet some friends for ice-cream at McDonald’s. We discussed that the family entertainment budget of $25 every two weeks was not available for another 10 days. We had enjoyed a pizza night together 4 days before, so we couldn’t join our friends for ice-cream today. The kids understand that we sacrifice and save now to enjoy good things together later on.

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  6. A few things we have done to let our children work with money is to purchase and provide funds for the care of a pet, and also to make crafts or grow vegetables for selling at our local farmers market.

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  7. My children are pretty young, some of them just learning to count money, but we are teaching them just the same. When they receive or earn money, a percentage goes to savings, a percentage goes to a charitable giving and a percentage is available for spending- with a lot of discussion about what is worthwhile. We explain to them why we choose to drive home to prepare food rather than stop at restaurants frequently and discuss the different choices we can have aside from buying things brand new- such as some items being purchased used or items needed for a short time may be worth looking into borrowing from someone. I didn’t learn much about finances formally when I was young, so I look forward to giving my kids a thorough education when they reach the age that they can have part-time jobs.

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  8. We have been purposeful in including our oldest in discussions about most household and family purchases and other financial decisions. She helps do the grocery and other shopping. We have had several discussions recently about checking accounts and credit card use. We will be getting her her own checking account and credit card soon to start using them.

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  9. Our kids “have” to divide their earnings into savings, giving and spending (the oldest @ 14 is not happy about that because it’s HIS money – even though he’s known about this method for 5 years). 🙂 We then try to let them use their spend money for toys or treats when they want to – we offer our wisdom as to what is a good buy…but we want them to make a few mistakes now too, so they can learn for themselves.

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  10. Oops, I didn’t see on the contest page that I needed to leave a comment about how I teach my child about real life finances. As soon as I give my son his allowance he divides into tythe, charity, taxes, business, long term savings, Medium term savings, and short term savings. He uses his short term savings for impulse buys, needs to decide in advance how to use his medium term savings, and the long term savings are for adulthood.

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  11. Our four oldest kids have a rabbit business. We live on some land and keep animals anyway. My husband is a veterinarian and some of the kids want to be. So the kids have several rabbits. They breed and sell babies to the local pet store. They study many aspects of animals and genetics. They also care for the animals 100%. They share the profit equally. And apply the Dave Ramsey for kids ideas to their income. (giving, long term savings, short term savings and spending)

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  12. We had our oldest son (now a college Freshman) go through FPU as a H.S. Junior. We have been able to pay for his first year of college without debt. His younger sister has watched the process and is putting in 1/4 of all her babysitting earnings to her 529. Our church will be participating in Momentum this fall, so she and her sister will go through Generation Change. I’d love to have the Foundations in Personal Finance curriculum, too!

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  13. My son took an young entrepreneurs class at co-op this year. It is teaching him about starting a business and how much work he has to do to see a profit.

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  14. I have used the older edition of Foundations in Personal Finance with my highschoolers, but would love to upgrade to the newer edition for my twins. We found the information helpful!

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  15. I have done very little to teach my 14 year old about real life finances. However, we’re often touting the principles taught in Dave Ramsey’s Total Money Makeover, 4 copies of which I gave to my older children to ensure that they’d not make the same mistake their parents did—getting 30 year mortgages on each of the houses we’ve owned over the years. Not smart.

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  16. We teach them what God says about money; we model it too! We teach them to divide up any money into 3 categories: offering (first), savings, spending. We encourage them to save for things they want and to wait to see how God will provide.

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  17. We discuss (in broad terms) our finances with our kids (8, 10) and discuss budgets, banking, and saving with them. We are starting to plant the seeds of saving for college in our older child.

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  18. Since my sons were about 10, we’ve done the three envelopes (save, give, spend) with their chore pay. We’ve also read all of the Junior books which help explain Dave’s concepts at their level. We expect them to save for their purchases and not borrow from us, and we explain how a credit card is different from a debit card (and why interest is soooo bad).

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  19. It is good to write goals down & plan a budget to go along with that! If you need money, then find creative ways to make money to support that!

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  20. A fellow homeschool friend, whose son also has a diagnosis on the Autism Spectrum (High Functioning) recently recommended Dave Ramsey’s curriculum to me. Both of our boys have difficulties with math and the concept of fincial planning seems to be a difficult issue for those on the Spectrum to grasp. Let’s be honest, even some normal functioning adults have difficulty grasping the concept of spending money in a wise manner. Some of the ways I have been working with my son to help him grasp such concepts has been to teach him needs versus wants, tithing and donations (giving to God what is His and helping others through giving because it is the right thing to do), saving money the wise way, not spending money as soon as you receive it (which has been our biggest challenge). I think this curriculum could help him grasp the harder ideas of financial planning by giving him new perspectives and pictures to draw from as we discuss financial planning. This is an important topic because I want him to be as self-sufficient as possible! Thank you for this opportunity!

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  21. Like many others stated above, as soon as our children began receiving allowances or earning money through jobs, we taught them to divide their money into various categories to address personal wants, the Church, gifts for others, and long-term savings. I wish I would have learned the same as a child myself. We are hoping to use Dave Ramsey’s curriculum with our high school children as well since we’ve heard so many wonderful things about it via friends in our speech and debate league.

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  22. We are currently using a weekly financial spreadsheet for our five children. They receive a small allowance and we reward their savings with a small interest. They have envelopes for tithe/missions, savings (in accounts now), and spending. They must wait 2 weeks to spend from savings, but may use spending as they please. They earn $.25/yr old each week. The kids are young and we’ve not yet considered a curriculum.

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  23. We love listening to Dave Ramsey! We have most of his books and follow his methods. Would love to have the kids books, but just haven’t made that a priority yet.

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  24. I bring them grocery shopping with me and discuss a variety of things that we do to save money, everything from making our own bread to turning off lights. It’s an ongoing discussion.

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  25. We strive to teach a strong work ethic, that money is a tool to be used wisely, and most importantly, do everything for the glory of God, including money management.

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  26. We’re planning on teaching our teens with this curriculum at some point. Love this giveaway! We currently are teaching the Biblical principles of finance…..such as those Dave teaches: no debt. Savings. Etc.

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  27. I read Smart Money Smart Kids last year and got more great ideas to teach financial responsibility. Our 3 boys have or are raising poultry , buying the feed, doing the work and selling for profit.

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  28. I believe in teaching my kids to think long term. I tell my kids that I am saving for a car, and they ask me why, since I already have a car. I tell them that if I start saving now, I should have enough money to pay cash for one by the time I need to buy another one. Then I won’t have to borrow money. I am trying to teach them to plan ahead. Planning now will avoid much panic and pain later.

    My daughter is asking me for details of how to budget. I would love this tool to teach her how.

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  29. My husband and I use what we have learned from, Dave Ramsey and also Steve and Annette Economides (Money Saving Family), to teach our kids about finances.

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  30. We listened to Dave Ramsey’s Financial Peace cd’s several years ago. We learned about the debt snowballing which was completely new to me, but it made so much sense! We are teaching our kids now to save half of the money they earn or receive as gifts! We want saving to be a habit!

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  31. My oldest living at home is working her own budget. The two in high school just opened certificates of deposit to earn a little more return on their money. They all tithe first and then put money in their envelopes. It is wonderful to see them accomplishing their own goals since going through some of Dave’s Financial Peace information two years ago.

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  32. To teach our daughter about finances, my husband and I give her an allowance. This has led to many conversations about the value of a dollar, wants vs. needs, and saving vs. spending.

    ***Our co-op leaders were just discussing doing the Ramsey curriculum for middle schoolers. Winning would make that so much easier! 🙂

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  33. We talk about money almost daily it seems, as my kids are always asking to buy things, or should I say, for us to buy them things. We encourage them to save their own money or add the item to their birthday or Christmas list. We also have them divide money they receive into 3 groups: tithe, save, and spend.

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  34. My boys are 8, 6, and 4. We talk to them a lot about managing their money but haven’t set up a system for them yet. I’d like to start the save/spend/share system with them soon.

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